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Here’s the best-looking DIY kitchen I’ve seen yet. No offense to the other DIY kitchens I’ve had the pleasure of meeting. They all had their charms. But this Los Angeles kitchen is so luscious. So strikingly handsome. The project took Liese and David 18 months, which is an awful long time to wash dishes in the bathtub. But the results are stunning.The kitchen cost $29,115 with the couple performing all the labor, nights and weekends, as well as doing some artful shopping. If you have any questions about how this kitchen was created, I might be able to persuade Liese and David to log on and give some answers. Here’s a list of where the money went: Cabinets: $15,000 Cabinet door glass: $300 Cabinet hardware: $360 Windows: $1,000 Electrical supplies: $200 Plumbing supplies: $100 Counter tile: $1,700 Floor tile: $500 Tile cutter rental: $100 Tile-related supplies: $320 Sink: $700 Faucets,…

“Take it,” Fishman said. From that starting point, the two women gathered other leftover high-end building materials, including porcelain tiles for the floor, wood for a vanity and a small piece of Caesarstone for the countertop. Fishman designed the new bathroom, and Fitzgerald hired a contractor, found through another school family, to build it. For $15,200, Fitzgerald got a sleek new bathroom with materials that Fishman, whose business is Designers Call, figures would have cost more than $19,000 if all the materials were purchased new. Before it was remodeled, the bathroom hadn’t been welcoming for a mother and her newborn. The tub was shallow, which was a problem for Fitzgerald, who is big on baths. It had a shower curtain and was surrounded by large tan tiles with brown grout, a popular look in the 1980s, but not now. A small vanity sat beneath a mirror and a cheap-looking stainless-steel…

In an effort to clean up Southland air, some of the dirtiest air in the nation, regulators are considering proposals that would put restrictions on fireplaces, according to a June 2 article in The Times: On the plus side, if you were thinking of taking out your existing fireplace to free up wall space, or to replace it with windows to improve your view or to allow light into the house, this could be a good excuse for that. (The full story is below.) Clean air plan OKd by Southland regulators If fully implemented, fireplace use could be severely restricted. Several officials express reservations about those parts of the proposal. By Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer June 2, 2007 Southern California air regulators Friday approved a comprehensive clean air plan that, if fully implemented, could place stringent restrictions on home fireplaces. But individual elements of the plan, approved unanimously by…

Living room and kitchen after The Los Angeles condominium Jay Falamaki bought several years ago was like scores of others in Southern California. “It was boring,” Falamaki says of the 860-square-foot condo’s white walls, vinyl floors and beige carpeting. “It was very basic with no character at all.” But bland surroundings would work for Falamaki, a native of Iran who studied set design at the American Film Institute in Hollywood, and who now works as a freelance designer. Kitchen before While his peers who own condos tend to put off remodeling until they move up into a house, Falamaki did not want to wait. “I’m here now,” he thought. “This is my everyday life. I must enjoy it.” But to get the two-bedroom, two-bathroom condo from where it was—dull—to where Falamaki wanted to be—dynamic—would cost tens of thousands of dollars, which he did not have. So: he decided to do…

Tomatoes and other high-acid foods may be processed using a water-bath canner as opposed to a pressure canner. The following are basic guidelines coming from the Ball Blue Book of Preservation. Visually examine canning jars for nicks, cracks, uneven rims or sharp edges that may prevent sealing or cause breakage. Examine canning lids to ensure they are free of dents and sealing compound is even and complete. Check bands for proper fit. Wash jars and two-piece caps in hot, soapy water. Rinse well. Dry bands; set aside. Heat jars and lids in a saucepot of simmering water (180°F or 82°C). DO NOT BOIL LIDS. Allow jars and lids to remain in hot water until ready for use, removing one at a time as needed. Fill boiling-water canner half-full with hot water. Elevate rack in canner. Put canner lid in place. Heat water just to a simmer (180°F or 82°C). Keep…